Books and Bagels

Books and Bagels

Books and Bagels

(usually) Second Tuesday of the Month, 9:15 a.m.,  Ministry Center, Room 7

Join us when the topic intrigues you!  Read the book ahead of time, and come to discuss the ideas that encouraged, inspired or challenged you.

Current and future books are available for sale in the Church Gift Shop (off the narthex, near the front doors off SeaGate).  Also we have a few copies to be borrowed and returned, available in the Ministry Center (see Susan near the front entrance between 8:30am- 12:30 pm).

 

 

FEBRUARY 13:  To Light a Fire on Earth:  Proclaiming the Gospel in a Secular Age by Bishop Robert Barron.

As secularism gains influence, and increasing numbers see religion as dull and backward, Bishop Barron wants to illuminate how beautiful, intelligent, and relevant the Catholic faith is.  Barron, founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries, proclaims in vivid language the goodness and truth of the Catholic tradition in this compelling new book—drawn from conversations with and narrated by award-winning Vatican journalist John L. Allen, Jr.Through Barron’s smart, practical, artistic, and theological observations as well as personal anecdotes—from engaging atheists on YouTube to discussing his days as a young diehard baseball fan from Chicago—To Light a Fire on the Earth covers prodigious ground.  Touching on everything from Jesus to prayer, science, movies, atheism, the spiritual life, the fate of Church in modern times, beauty, art, and social media, Barron reveals why the Church matters today and how Catholics can intelligently engage a skeptical world.


 

March 13:  The Shepherd Who Didn't Run by Maria Ruiz Scaperlanda  ***2016 Catholic Press Association Book Awards Winner! 3rd Place, Biography category***

"The shepherd cannot run at the first sign of danger." - Fr. Stanley Francis Rother.  Fr. Rother was true to his word. He did not run. And was martyred at the age of 46.

Fr. Stanley arrived in Guatemala in 1968, and immediately identified with his parishioners' simple, farming lifestyle. He learned their languages, prepared them for the Sacraments, and cared for their needs. Fr. Stanley, or "Padre Francisco" as he was called by his beloved Tz'utujil Indians, had found his heart's calling. After nearly a decade, the violence of the Guatemalan civil war found its way into the peaceful village. Disappearances, killings, and danger became daily occurrences, but despite this unrest Fr. Stanley remained hard at work, building a farmer's co-op, a school, a hospital, and the first Catholic radio station, used for catechesis. In early 1981, his name was on a death list, so he returned to Oklahoma and was warned not to return. But he could not abandon his people, so he went back, and made the ultimate sacrifice for his faith.  "Pray for us that we may be a sign of the love of Christ for our people," said Fr. Stanley, "that our presence among them will fortify them to endure these sufferings in preparation for the coming of the Kingdom."

Fr. Tom Boyer, a local retired priest who often celebrates Mass here, has an Oklahoma connection with Fr. Rother. He first brought the book to our attention. Find an independent review by clicking here.

 


 

April 10:  A Deadly Wandering:  A Mystery, a Landmark Investigation, and the Astonishing Science of Attention in the Digital Age  by Matt Richtel

In this ambitious, compelling, and beautifully written book, Matt Richtel, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times, examines the impact of technology on our lives through the story of Utah college student Reggie Shaw, who killed two scientists while texting and driving. Richtel follows Reggie through the tragedy, the police investigation, his prosecution, and ultimately, his redemption. In the wake of his experience, Reggie has become a leading advocate against “distracted driving.” Richtel interweaves Reggie’s story with cutting-edge scientific findings regarding human attention and the impact of technology on our brains, proposing solid, practical, and actionable solutions to help manage this crisis individually and as a society. A propulsive read filled with fascinating, accessible detail, riveting narrative tension, and emotional depth, A Deadly Wandering explores one of the biggest questions of our time—what is all of our technology doing to us?—and provides unsettling and important answers and information we all need.

 

 

 

Past selections include:

2018

January:  Thrift Store Saints: Meeting Jesus 25 cents at a time by Jane Knuth.

2017

December:  None (book swap)

November: Wish You Were Here: travels through loss and hope  by Amy Welborn

October:  What's so Funny about Faith by Jake Martin

September:  Prayer, Our Deepest Longing by Ronald Rolheiser (postponed by Irma / Discussed in October)

August - Walk in a Relaxed Manner  by Joyce Rupp. OR  Discovering El Camino  by Fr. Greg Markey.  

July:  none

June:   The God Box by Mary Lou Quinlan 

May:   A Good Man is Hard to Find & Other Stories by Flannery O’Connor  

April - The Second Greatest Story Ever Told by Fr. Michael E. Gaitley, MIC

March  - Everybody Needs to Forgive Somebody by Alan Hunt

February  - How God Changes Your Brain by Andrew Newberg, MS and Mark Robert Waldman

January  - Thy Will be Done: Letters to Persons in the World by Saint Francis de Sales

2016

Reaching Out by Henri Nouwen

My Life with the Saints by Fr. James Martin, S.J.

What's so Great about Christianity by Dinesh D'Souza

Five Years in Heaven by John Schlimm

The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis

The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis